2017 SFJ conference schedule: Success Stories

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REGISTER TODAY! $125 for college students; $350 for members; $450 for non-members!

 


WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27

6-9 p.m. Opening reception at the hotel.

Come meet your fellow features creatures, register for the conference and relax.

THURSDAY, Sept. 28

Location: The Star’s Press Pavilion, 1601 McGee St.

8-9 a.m.: Shuttle service from hotel to Press Pavilion. Continental breakfast and registration at the Pavilion.

9-10 a.m.: Robb Armstrong of “Jump Start (an Andrews McMeel syndicate) will tell us how he went from a college student at Syracuse University with a comic strip to becoming a nationally syndicated cartoonist. He’s also written a memoir, Fearless: A Cartoonist’s Guide to Life.”

10-11:15 a.m.: Digital tools you shouldn’t live without, by Jennifer Brett of Atlanta Journal Constitution. Topics she’ll cover include:

  • How to repurpose user-generated content from Facebook without an embed code. (once you have secured the content creator’s permission, of course)

  • How to use geo curation to enhance social searches

  • How to repurpose ephemeral Snapchat or Instagram Stories

  • How to create engaging social pushes to promote your content using a combination of apps

  • Facebook Live tips

11:15-11:30 a.m.: Break.

11:30 a.m. to noon: Visit KC — KC’s tourism bureau — welcomes us. 

Noon-1:30 p.m.: Awards luncheon. 

1:30-2 p.m.: Break

2-3 p.m.: SFJ winners tell all.

Contest organizer and retired Virginian-Pilot features editor Jim Haag will host a panel discussion with some of this year’s winners about how they do what they do.

3-4 p.m.: Show & Steal. Sharon Chapman and Laura Coffey.

One of the most popular segments of the conference, editors share their best ideas from the year past for anyone to steal.

4-5 p.m.: Shuttle service back to hotel.

5:30-6:30 p.m.: Shuttle service to Andrews McMeel from hotel lobby.

6-9 p.m.: Silent Auction at Andrews McMeel, 1130 Walnut St

If you have “Doonesbury,” “For Better For Worse” or “Phoebe the Unicorn” in your paper, then you’re an Andrews McMeel client. The syndicate is hosting this year’s Silent Auction in its lovely art deco digs.

FRIDAY, Sept. 29

Location: The Star’s Press Pavilion

8-9 a.m.: Shuttle service from hotel to Press Pavilion. Continental breakfast 

9-10 a.m.: How to dive deep, author Candice Millard

Kansas City-based bestselling author and journalist Candice Millard has written three award-winning New York Times bestsellers: “The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey,” “Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine & the Murder of a President” (about James Garfield) and her latest, “Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape and the Making of Winston Churchill.” Candice will explain how she does her meticulous research and how she finds the story that no one else has told.

10-11:30 a.m.SPJ-Google News Lab Training: Google Tools Fundamentals with Abigail Edge

Freelance journalist Abigail Edge will give an overview of how Google’s tools can help you research stories, fact-check, find what’s trending, and locate useful datasets. The workshop will highlight: advanced Google Search techniques, Google Trends, Google Public Data Explorer, and more to ensure you’re covered on how to fully uncover things.

11:30-noon: Break

Noon-1 p.m.: Lunch + Diversity Fellows presentation
Grab a bite to eat while listening to our amazing Diversity Fellows, Rashod Ollison of The
Virginian-Pilot and Michelle Zenarosa of Everyday Feminism and Woke magazines.

1-2 p.m.: Facebook Live shows: How to do them, and do they make money?

The Kansas City Star has launched several regularly scheduled Facebook Live shows, some of which are sponsored. Here are some lessons we’ve learned.

2-3 p.m.: Atten-TION! with Jennifer Rowe of Missouri School of Journalism

Help your stories get noticed with exciting headlines and compelling leads. This session will provide tips for how to write attention-grabbing headlines and story leads with contemporary and classic examples from award-winning features. Learn how to sell your stories and start them off so that readers just can’t turn away.

3-4 p.m.: Lynden Steele: Life after the Pulitzer — how to find the story after the story

Lynden, assistant managing editor for photography at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and his team won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for its coverage of the protests in Ferguson. But the stories don’t end with journalism’s highest honor; Lynden will share how the newsroom followed up with even more award-winning coverage.

4-4:15 p.m.: Meet the future
We’ll introduce our student attendees.

4-4:15 p.m. | Changing of the guard
It’s a time-honored tradition: The current SFJ president, Kathy Lu, turns over the gavel – and a few other surprising pieces of clothing – to the incoming president, Jim Haag. Then, sadly, it’s time to wrap it up.

4:30-5:30 p.m. | SHUTTLE BACK TO HOTEL

Free evening. Students heading to Royals game.

SATURDAY, Sept. 30 (Campus connection)

This session is designed for our college participants. However, journalists who would like to volunteer to help provide feedback or network with the students are welcome.

8-9 a.m.: Breakfast, location TBA

9 a.m. to noon: Network & feedback, location TBA

Professional journalists will spend about 10 minutes with each student who wants feedback on various topics, including resume feedback, portfolio feedback, and interview tips.

12:30-1:30 p.m.: SFJ board meeting, location TBA


*Subject to change

Digital Tools — making headline magic

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Marketing and advertising types are just as obsessed with getting people to absorb their message.

So, here’s some digital tools that marketers use to test headlines.

Coschedule headline analyzer

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Click here for link

Type in a headline, and it will rate it based on its ability to connect emotionally, tell your story simply, and what “power words” you can use. It breaks down a headline on its neutrality, and gives you a preview as a Google SEO.

It’s not free, but you can sign up for a trial period.


Advanced Marketing Institute headline analyzer

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Click here for link

This is a less sexy version of a headline analyzer. It lets you get your headline parsed by subject.


Mailchimp’s subject line analyzer

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Click here for link

You have to be a Mailchimp subscriber to use this, but this can help you hone your subject lines, which could make the difference between a read clicking and not clicking.

 

 

 

Digital tool of the day: Soundbite

The tool: Soundcite, created by KnightLabs.

What is it? A way to smoothly embed sound bites into a narrative

What can it do? Take sound clips, 9-1-1 call excerpts and other recorded material and use it as part of your story. Bring your stories to life with sound.

Use it to illustrate parts of songs; to bring quotes to life in a narrative. To insert audio history.

Find it: https://soundcite.knightlab.com


Here’s how the New York Times used music bites in a great story you the lost history of American female musicians.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/04/13/magazine/blues.html

 

Digital tools: Line, Peach and Kik are all names you should know

 

Today we’re talking about three messaging apps that are being used in different ways.

Peach

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What is Peach? You might have heard about the new social app called Peach. It’s either the hottest app going, or the app that’s already been declared dead on arrival.

What’s different about Peach? It seems to have more of an emotional component, allowing your words to be enhanced by media that speaks to the mood of your post, using a “magical words” tool.

In other words, it’s like Oprah. It is designed to evoke feelings. As the New Republic writes, “Advertisers have known this for decades. It isn’t enough for a thing to be useful or good; the thing has to fulfill some more unconscious need. So in other words, successful apps build structures that reward our pleasure centers. They compel you to click.”

Line

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What is Line? A messaging app that’s popular in Asia. Much like Facebook, it builds around a community. 60 percent of its user base are in Japan, Indonesia, Thailand and Taiwan.

One advantage is that is was created with a mobile-first mentality, and, while it’s a messaging app, it has evolved into a network in which publications can share news and links to their followers.

It also has some intuitive functions, like a “digital butler” service that will deliver goods and services on demand. And it’s got virtual stickers, which are like emojis. Future plans are to add payments and other mobile services onto the platform.

The Wall Street Journal has harnessed it to share targeted stories to its followers, mostly in Asia. One disadvantage? It doesn’t have accompanying analytics, so it’s probably a hard sell to use in a wide sense.

Kik

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What is Kik? Kik is a messaging platform that is being used by young people. It works like a messaging service, but the conversation can be among several people, much like a chat room. Messages disappear quickly.

Kik doesn’t require a link to a “real” profile like Facebook, which is why it’s being used by 40 percent of young people, by one estimation. And it’s why it’s been targeted by criminals and linked to cyber-bullying. Kik conversations between 13-year-old Nicole Lovell and an 18-year-old Virginia Tech student led to kidnapping and murder of the girl, and subsequent stories to parents and teens about the app.

Have a Digital Tool question or idea? Email Betsey Guzior at bguzior@bizjournals.com

 

 

Digital Tool Tuesday: Round ’em up

twitter

A roundup of news on digital tools:

Live feeds in the Twitter timeline: Periscope is inching closer to being a great live news tool as Twitter now can let live feeds run in the app. It can be useful for journalists covering live and unfolding events. It will show up in the Twitter feed, but not in support apps such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite.

To use it, open Periscope. Write something about the broadcast before you begin, so followers can understand what’s going on.

As a precaution, have someone with an open Twitter feed checking to make sure your orientation is correct. I have seen many folks using a landscape orientation, which, in Twitter land, isn’t necessary.

And, if viewers want to add live comments or “heart” a broadcast, they still will have to open the Periscope app.

New features on Playbuzz. I’ve written about Playbuzz, the easy quiz generator. If have not used it lately, check it out again. Playbuzz has added several new quiz and poll forms, including a swiper.

The swiper is a Tinder-like function that allows viewers to vote a photo up or down. It’s already being used in awards season the red carpet. It’s ideal for a mobile audience that you can’t get with traditional photo galleries.

Here’s how it’s used for a quick election poll.

We’re waiting with bated breath for a bracket tool; please, Playbuzz?

 

Digital Tool Tuesday: Genius annotation

 

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Genius began as a way to annotate song lyrics, and it still serves this function. But more and more, it’s being used by news organizations to add context to speeches, transcripts or even live events.

It’s super easy to use. Sign up for Genius; once it is activated you can highlight a piece of text, click on a pop-up button, add text, links, embeds from social media.

The Washington Post used Genius to annotate President Obama’s speech Tuesday announcing new executive measures on gun control. It included links to background stories, tweets from the Post’s columnists and experts, and fact-checking.

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 8.51.43 AM Just think of how you can use it. For speeches during awards season, or your political leaders’ major addresses. You can use it to fill in the blanks while covering a live event.

It also serves as a social network, so you can connect with other publications to share Genius annotations.

Learn more by clicking here.

 

Digital Tool Tuesday: Facebook bells and whistles

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Stream live video through Facebook Mentions

Facebook has been testing a live stream directly from its site, and soon will make it available to all Facebook users.

As Forbes has reported, social media live streaming — with Periscope and Meerkat leading the way — is exploding, and viewers will want more in 2016.

You’ll be able to do live video by clicking a live video icon. You can write a description and pick your audience (much like when you post). then click “Go Live.”

Click here for some examples of how it’s been used so far by celebrities, brands and political figures.

Also, Facebook Notes — the expansion of function that didn’t have a high profile, got a facelift, and is starting to look more like a real blogging tool.

You have seen how powerful narratives with photos can be with Humans of New York. Now Facebook is providing a place to include photos, videos and a long narrative in an attractive package.

Here’s more on the Notes update

QUESTION: How could features editors and writers be using this?